Interesting Links

I have personnally tried all the links and references below, unless specified otherwise. It does not mean that I guarantee their content, but only that I've found them interesting.

WEB sites

related to Regional/Ethnic/Handcrafted dolls

Where to get folk dolls on the WEB

Stephanie's World of Dolls. Stephanie's EBay store. Here is what Stephanie writes about her own site: 'I sell only NEW, international dolls from around the world. I found there was very few suppliers of new dolls for the international doll collector, so I filled the niche by going out on my own and creating a small business of it (more like a hobby). Through this E-bay store I am able to meet international doll collectors (like you and I) and help them expend their collections with quality dolls (not dusty, old ones). Also through importing these dolls I help many woman's organizations and non-for profit organizations develop these dolls for a Western market.'

Mingei International Museum. The page directs to the museum store. The page describes Alexandra dolls, which are beautiful russian dolls, also mentioned in Susan Hedricks' book (see below).

Dolls of India. Handcrafted dolls reprensenting folk costumes or dances from India, but also other international dolls.

Dolls of India: Life like cloth dolls and more

 

 

 

 

 

About dolls and costumes

A page for Japanese dolls: A very dense personal site about Japanese dolls.

Canadian Civilizations: site about canadian dolls, from pre-history to nowadays. Nice pictures of old Inuit dolls.

Folk Costume WEB links: a page of links about costumes from almost anywhere. Great.

Sites about other folk dolls collections have moved to the dedicated page: Other Collectors

Books

in French or English, about Regional dolls and /or regional clothes

"World Colors Dolls and Dress" by Susan Hedrick & Vilma Matchette - Hobby House Press - Folk & Ethnic Dolls

A wonderful book with big pictures IN COLOR of gorgeous folk dolls. Dolls and costumes are well-described and compared to real-life costumes through various postcards. THE book on the topic. Only negative (small) point: many of the dolls are antics: dolls made in France or Germany, then dressed in the country, as dolls companies used to do in the past. As I belong to the purists the authors mention, that type of doll does not belong to my collection. But I discovered many modern doll-makers through the book, and I will always thank the authors.

"The Encyclopedia of Regional Dolls of the world" by Marjory Fainges - Kangaroo Press.

As the author is Australian, this encyclopedia is very well-documented about southern-hemisphere countries. You will find all sorts of dolls, from the ugly plastic doll for tourists, to the wonderfully-carved doll. Countries are listed in alphabetical order, with a description of the country (history, geography) and photos of dolls from the country. Drawbacks: half of the pictures are in black and white, which is a pity when the legend reads "beautifuly coloured doll...". Dolls description is very short, while the country description is usually long, but not linked to the dolls: I would have liked explanations about the origin of the costume, for example.

"Provençal Figurines" by C.Galtier and E.Cattin - Editions Ouest-France

Sold in museums and places for tourists, this booklet is still the best book on santons that I have ever read. Good variety of examples and adresses.

"European Costumed Dolls" by Polly et Pam Judd - Hobby House Press. And the 2 other books in the serie: Americas, Australia & Pacific Islands and African and Asian.

These 3 books present various types of folk dolls from many countries, with an indicative price. Some prices may be surprising and seem a bit outdated. Dolls quality is not always at its best, but I discovered some artists or brands thanks to these books. The referencing for the European dolls pictures is a bit difficult to understand.

 

 

 

"Costumes des Terroirs de France" by the Confédération Nationale des Groupes Folkloriques Français - Editions Le Vieil Annecy.

Precise description of the costumes of all the folk dancers bands in France. If you want to become a specialist.. Nicely pictured. But probably hard to find.

"Miniatures et modèles réduits" by Daniel Puiboube - Editions Solar

For its short but clever chapter about Santons de Provence.

"La Folie des Poupées de Pays" by Lélie Carnot - Flammarion

Very well-informed and many colorful pictures. The dolls that are represented are mainly celluloid and plastic, many of them are French. Where to learn how to recognize celluloid, and make the difference between Petitcollin, SNF, Convert.. if you can read French. Dolls quality ranges from very low to very high, but the author is very frank about it.

 

Addresses and Museums

Santons

Musée de Fontaine-de-Vaucluse: small but interesting santon museum

La Petite Provence du Paradou : more than 400 santons (30 cm) in a miniature Provençal village. Magnifique!

Musée de santons des Baux-de-Provence: so small that you can hardly see anything, but the entrance is free. Very old santons.

Santons makers: most of them are around Aubagne (13).

Lise Berger - Roquevaire

Scaturro - Aubagne

See the French version of my site for more information about santons-makers.

 

 

Dolls makers

Atelier PetitCollin: you can visit the last French doll factory in the Meuse department. For more information, the WEB site: http://www.in-lorraine.co.uk/lorraine-tourism/french-dolls.php

Charlotte Weibull - Malmö - Sweden - WEB site

Alexandra dolls - Russia - WEB site

Shankar's International dolls museum - New Delhi - India - Museum created in New Delhi by the Indian cartoonist K. Shankar Pillai, who also fell in love with costume dolls. They have a doll-maker workshop and they exchange dolls with other museums. WEB site: http://www.childrensbooktrust.com/dolls.htm

Norbulingka Institute, Preserving Tibetan Culture. The page below is dedicated to the hand-crafted regional and traditional dolls. I know the link is broken, but the site was wonderful. If it comes back on line, or if anybody knows why it disappeared, please let me know. http://norbulingkainstitute.org/site/losel/losel.htm (broken link)

A special thank to the University of Austin, Texas and its WEB site, where I got the big world map on the Home page and the European map, and to FOTW Flags Of The World where I got the other maps.

You can have a quick look at my first -and so reduced- collection Web site. On WhataCollection.com, where any collector can easily expose his/her collection for free: http://www.whatacollection.com/

 

 
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